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Nutrition Spotlight: What Do We Know About Nutrition and Prostate Cancer

Virginia Cancer Specialists Practice Blog

December 29, 2021
Virginia Cancer Specialists » VCS Practice News » Cancer Types » VCS Practice News » Prostate Cancer » Nutrition Spotlight: What Do We Know About Nutrition and Prostate Cancer

Fast Facts

Prostate cancer is common. In fact, it’s the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, after skin cancer. Approximately one in eight men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer over his lifetime.

  1. It’s more common in some individuals than others. Prostate cancer is more likely to occur as men get older (the majority of cases are diagnosed at age 65 and older). Non-Hispanic Black men have a higher risk developing prostate cancer.
  2. It’s highly treatable, especially if caught early. While prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in men, after lung cancer, it’s highly treatable and survivable in many. In fact, the American Cancer Society estimates that 3.1 million men diagnosed with prostate cancer are still alive in the US today!
  3. You can work with your doctor to determine the right time to test. This decision will likely be based on a variety of factors including age, family history, and other health factors. Two common ways to test is by blood (PSA or prostate-specific antigen) test or through a rectal exam.
  4. One diet and lifestyle factor related to the development of prostate cancer is obesity. Getting to and staying at a healthy weight involves all the tried-and-true principles you have heard time and time again from those of us in the nutrition field, as well as others in healthcare and in fitness (there’s no magic pill or easy fix!):
      • Prioritize fruits and vegetables
      • Choose foods high in fiber (e.g., whole grains, beans)
      • Watch your portion sizes
      • Be physically active – every day

To check your BMI, use this calculator from the National Institutes of Health.

Virginia Cancer Specialists, Registered Dietitian